what we did

GIS Mapping

We had relatively easy access to traditional data from local and national sources – socio-economic measures, neighbourhood vulnerability indices, census data, crime rates, and so on. With the help of our RECOVER partners, we also had access to data related to social services and programming. Using an interactive mapping program, we mapped data geographically. We also layered different data sets to tell a more complete story. Interactive mapping has helped us see important patterns that have informed our approach. 

We have combined the typical neighbourhood profile data -  demographic and vulnerability measures, such as income/low income, movers, renters, new immigrants, etc, with what we are calling demand indicators - data from our partners at Reach, 211, and Boyle Community Services, to map out where actual need is being demonstrated.


# of People in Low Income (2011) with 211 Basic Needs Calls (2017)

People with low income are at a higher risk for falling into more vulnerable states. While need, as demonstrated by calls to 211 requesting Basic Needs services, such as food, shelter, and material goods, appears to be concentrated in neighbourhoods with high numbers of low income people, this also shows that there are people at risk in a wide range of Edmonton neighbourhoods.

  Base Layer:  Number of people in low income according to AT-LIM (after tax-low income measure), source: 2011 National Household Survey (NHS)   Clusters: N umber of calls in 2017 to 211 regarding Basic Needs (food, material goods, shelter/housing) (fyi: the 3 large clusters within the Recover boundaries represent 395, 1413, 303 calls, from top to bottom. Total number of call represented = 9044)

Base Layer: Number of people in low income according to AT-LIM (after tax-low income measure), source: 2011 National Household Survey (NHS)

Clusters: Number of calls in 2017 to 211 regarding Basic Needs (food, material goods, shelter/housing) (fyi: the 3 large clusters within the Recover boundaries represent 395, 1413, 303 calls, from top to bottom. Total number of call represented = 9044)

 

211 Calls for Basic Needs and Mental Health/Addictions with Reach 24/7 Calls Involving Homelessnes

Higher needs calls (mental health, addictions, homelessness, basic needs) for both “demand indicator” services have a high concentration of calls within our Recover boundary, showing we have started off Recover in the right part of the city.

However there are additional areas showing growing need, such as those two large clusters south of the river in the Strathcona/University area. A hot spot analysis of the Reach 24/7 data (not pictured) showed the Strathcona/University area as an emerging hot spot (while the downtown was considered a persistent hotspot).

  Base Layer:  Heatmap of calls to 211 in 2017 about Basic Needs and Mental Health/Addictions   Clusters:  Reach 24/7 Crisis Diversion calls in 2017 involving homelessness

Base Layer: Heatmap of calls to 211 in 2017 about Basic Needs and Mental Health/Addictions

Clusters: Reach 24/7 Crisis Diversion calls in 2017 involving homelessness

 

Reach 24/7 Winter Calls with Agencies Supporting Homeless People

The demand for Reach’s 24/7 Crisis Diversion services are spread throughout the city, even in winter, when one might expect people to stick close to downtown and the agencies that support them.

We can also see the intense clustering of agencies supporting homeless and marginalized people within the Recover neighbourhoods.

  Base Layer:  Reach 24/7 Crisis Diversion Calls, Winter (October 2016 - March 2017)   Data Points:  Locations of Agencies serving homeless/marginalized people (support services, outreach, shelters and transitional housing, food/meals and basic needs)

Base Layer: Reach 24/7 Crisis Diversion Calls, Winter (October 2016 - March 2017)

Data Points: Locations of Agencies serving homeless/marginalized people (support services, outreach, shelters and transitional housing, food/meals and basic needs)